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Afghan women hit back at the Taliban, one picture at a time

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Photograph: Twitter/ @arianadelawar

Afghan women throughout the world are elevating their voice in opposition to the Taliban’s strict new gown code for feminine college students with a highly effective social media marketing campaign.

They’ve taken to social media platform Twitter to submit footage of themselves, their households and buddies carrying conventional Afghan attire to spotlight the richness and variety of their tradition. The social media marketing campaign is gaining traction, with #DoNotTouchMyClothes and #AfghanistanCulture trending on Twitter.

The marketing campaign was began by Bahar Jalali, a former historical past professor at the American College in Afghanistan, to protest the Taliban’s obligatory imposition of Hijab for women.

Lately Taliban’s new larger schooling minister had introduced that feminine college students shall be allowed to attend gender-separated courses in universities, however solely in correct Islamic gown codes.

Jalali mentioned she began the marketing campaign as a result of one of her “largest considerations is Afghanistan’s id and sovereignty is beneath assault”, BBC reported her as saying.

She posted a picture of herself on Twitter in a inexperienced Afghan gown and urged different Afghan women to share theirs to indicate “the true face of Afghanistan”.

Different Afghan women responded by sharing footage of themselves in vibrant conventional attire from throughout the nation, in full opposition to the black hijab mandated by the Taliban.

The top of the Afghan service at DW Information, Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi, additionally shared a {photograph} of herself carrying an Afghani outfit and a headdress.

One other lady who took half in the Twitter marketing campaign is Malali Bashir, an Afghan journalist based mostly in Prague. She additionally paints Afghan women of their conventional attire to “present the world the fantastic thing about our tradition”.

She informed BBC that rising up in her village “a burqa, both black or blue, was by no means a norm and women wore their Afghan cultural attire. Older women wore a black head overlaying and youthful ones wore vibrant shawls. Women greeted males by shaking fingers,” she mentioned.

A number of different Afghan women supported the pattern on Twitter:

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